Matt Kleberg
LL Bean Boudoir, 2016
Oil Stick on Canvas
60 x 48 in
Matt Kleberg
Do What Say Do II, 2016
Oil Stick on Canvas
72 x 58 in
Matt Kleberg
Sink Hole (Uncle High Lonesome), 2016
Oil Stick on Canvas
44 x 36 in
Matt Kleberg
Bob Thompson and The J-Town Take-Down, 2015
Oil Stick on Canvas (Two Panels)
66 x 96 in
Matt Kleberg
Midnight and I'm Not Famous Yet, 2016
Oil Stick on Canvas
44 x 36 in

Matt Kleberg

Ride, Fly, Penetrate, Loiter, 2016

Oil Stick on Canvas

24 x 18 in 

Matt Kleberg
Two Gone Over, 2016
Oil Stick on Canvas
60 x 48 in
Matt Kleberg
Franny, 2016
Oil Stick on Canvas
60 x 48 in

Matt Kleberg

The Get Down, 2015

Oil Stick on Canvas on Seven Panels, Lumber, Bricks

85 x 83.5 x 10 in

Matt Kleberg
The Turkey, 2016
Oil Stick on Canvas
44 x 36 in
Matt Kleberg
Hankering For An Honorable Skull, 2016
Oil Stick on Canvas
72 x 58 in
 
Matt Kleberg
High Water Railers, 2015
Oil Stick on Canvas
60 x 48 in
Matt Kleberg
Terlingua Relic, 2015
Oil and Oil Stick on Canvas with Piano Hinges (Triptych)
96 x 84 in
Matt Kleberg
A Late Encounter, 2015
Oil Stick on Canvas (Seven Panels)
92 x 68 in
Matt Kleberg
Flat Screen, 2016
Oil Stick on Canvas
36 x 30 in

Matt Kleberg

Hankerings

March 31 – May 7, 2016

The exhibition title refers to J.D. Salinger’s Franny and Zooey, a novel whose themes entertain the tension between embodiment and transcendence. According to Zooey, the older brother of the distressed protagonist Franny, one can’t escape the reality of their desires, proclivities, and hankerings, and to ignore them is to waste one’s time “in this goddam phenomenal world” (F&Z, p. 167). That same tension animates these new paintings.

 

The work borrows from architectural and ornamental references such as altars, theater sets, and stages, all spaces that frame specific actions and actors, suggesting an interest in performativity, whether ritual or theatrical.

 

With a practice formerly concerned with figuration, Kleberg’s recent work offers the absence of any depicted actor. Pregnant spaces and the presence of the hand imply the possibility of the figure, and, by extension, implicate the viewer in their own embodiment. The insistent framing in all of the work, and the sculptural elements of some, reiterate that the paintings themselves are objects or bodies in space. Bright colors and repetitive marks have the hum of the rhapsodic, but the wonkiness evokes something decidedly human. 

Press

Painting is Dead Hankerings @ Morgan Lehman and Mulherin
The New York Times The Lower East Side as Petri Dish
New American Paintings
Vice All the Beautiful, Expensive, and Corny Art I Saw at Art Basel This Year
Painting is Dead Matt Phillips with Matt Kleberg
Artdaily Untitled, Miami Beach, 2015 raises the bar with increased attendance and robust sales
ARTSY 50 Must-See Artworks at NADA, PULSE, UNTITLED., and Art Miami